AKUPHONE

Baba Yaga

Tamayugé

Baba Yaga

Tamayugé

17,90€ - LP (Vinyl + Download) 8,90€ - Digital

# Electronic, Avant-garde, J-pop, Chiptune, Abstract, Synthpop
  • Limited to 1000 ex.
  • Uncoated sleeve
  • Redeem code
  • Free postcard with first orders
Reviews:

Ukranian/Japanese duo Tamayugé hex the trippy headz at Paris’ Akuphone with a ‘marishly cute but f**ked up invocation of ‘Baba Yaga’, the witch-like Slavic folklore figure. Check for strangest feels in the murky Finnish psych styles of ‘Chornei, what sounds like Phew duelling Elvin Brandhi on ’Tamago’, or a Breadwoman baked from infected rye in ‘Herbert Song’  (Boomkat Product Review)
After Ko Shin Moon, The Dwarfs of East Agouza and Praed, Akuphone continues its sonic exploration of freaky electronic music with Tamayugé
Blend of experimental music, creepiness melancholia and kitschy tones, this surprising collaboration release his first album Baba Yaga.

At the head of: Maya Kuroki and Tamara Filyavich, a Japanese and a Ukrainian now based in Montreal. Maya Kuroki's phantasmagoric vocals and dreamy guitar added to Tamara Filyavich's team of electronic ghosts fresh out of her nightmares and invite is to a strange ritual, between tormented performance and feminist ceremony. Like Baba Yaga, an ambivalent character of the Slav Mythology, both part of Japanese and Ukrainian cultures, Tamayugé’s music brings scary and exciting shivers and open to an enigmatic imaginary.

The mysterious and unsettling Tamayuge’s universe is somewhere between Phew, Laurie Anderson and The Residents!

Après Ko Shin Moon, The Dwarfs of East Agouza and Praed, Akuphone poursuit son exploration sonique de la musique actuelle avec Tamayugé
Mélange de musique expérimentale, de sonorités kitch et aux accents tantôt mélancoliques tantôt inquiétants, cette surprenante collaboration musicale sort son premier album Baba Yaga.

À la manœuvre : la Japonaise Maya Kuroki et l’Ukrainienne Tamara Filyavich, toutes deux basées à Montréal. La voix fantasmagorique de Maya et sa guitare rêveuse fusionnent avec les fantômes électroniques sortant des machines cauchemardesques de Tamara et nous invite à un étrange rituel, entre performance tourmentée et cérémonie féministe. A l’image de Baba Yaga, personnage ambivalent de la mythologie slave et commune aux cultures ukrainienne et japonaise, la musique de Tamayugé procure des frissons de peur et d’excitation et ouvre vers des imaginaires énigmatiques.

L’univers troublant et mystérieux de Tamayugé se trouve quelque part entre Phew, Laurie Anderson et The Residents, avis aux amateurs et amatrices !